Ridgewood Reservoir community meeting, January 17, 2016; Since 2016, NYC H2O has been leading a coalition of community groups to protect and preserve the Ridgewood Reservoir. In 2016 and 2017, NYC H2O held four community meetings with 140 people attending, including parks and elected officials, and led 26 free community tours reaching 750 community members. Courtesy of dcap, David Cunningham Architecture Planning; and RAFT

Created in 2017 by NYC H2O for use at community meetings and with government officials, the concept boards explore the value of the Ridgewood Reservoir and why it is worth preserving. Courtesy of NYC H2O

Fence around Ridgewood Reservoir, circa 1915; Courtesy of the Museum of the City of New York

Created in 2017 by NYC H2O for use at community meetings and with government officials, the concept boards explore the value of the Ridgewood Reservoir and why it is worth preserving. Courtesy of NYC H2O

Created in 2017 by NYC H2O for use at community meetings and with government officials, the concept boards explore the value of the Ridgewood Reservoir and why it is worth preserving. Courtesy of NYC H2O

Wetland Delineation Report – Ridgewood Reservoir NYC H2O, in conjunction with many others, successfully advocated with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) for protected wetland designation for parts of the Ridgewood Reservoir which was achieved on February 22, 2018. The organization also advocated to have DEC and New York City Parks & Recreation agree to reclassify the walls of the Reservoir as a non-hazardous dam, thereby avoiding their demolition. Courtesy NYC H2O

National Register of Historic Places Registration Form NYC H2O, with the support of electeds and community groups, wrote and submitted the application to the NY State and National Historic Registers which led to the Ridgewood Reservoir being designated as an historic place on February 2, 2018. This significant action by the Federal Government adds a layer of protection to the remaining structures on the site which housed the water supply for the City of Brooklyn. Courtesy NYC H2O

Documentation of NYC H2O stewardship programs, 2019; Today, NYC H2O, in cooperation with NYC Parks, is leading the effort to protect and restore the native ecology of the Ridgewood Reservoir and its surroundings. Courtesy of NYC H2O

Ostun and Tony in the boat; Courtesy David Chuchuca

Gloria removing phragmites; Courtesy of Paul C. Tucker

Documentation of NYC H2O stewardship programs, 2019; Today, NYC H2O, in cooperation with NYC Parks, is leading the effort to protect and restore the native ecology of the Ridgewood Reservoir and its surroundings. Courtesy of NYC H2O

East Causeway, June and October, 2019; In 2019, the quarter-mile East Causeway path was opened to the public for the first time in decades due to the work by NYC H2O crews and volunteers. Courtesy of NYC H2O

East Causeway, June and October, 2019; In 2019, the quarter-mile East Causeway path was opened to the public for the first time in decades due to the work by NYC H2O crews and volunteers. Courtesy of NYC H2O

H2O crew at the gates of the west gatehouse, Fall 2019; Courtesy of NYC H2O

Daniele Frazier, b. 1985, Mill Valley, California Ecology Sampler, 2019-2020; nylon flagcloth, aluminum pole, flag hardware, enamel paint; Created by the artist in her Cypress Hills studio, hung in Highland Park, and capturing the diversity of the present day local ecology in the Ridgewood Reservoir area; Courtesy of Daniele Frazier

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Programs/ Ridgewood Reservoir /RR for the 21st century / NYC H2O

NYC H2O

NYC H2O, in cooperation with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, continues to lead the efforts to protect and restore the native ecology of the Ridgewood Reservoir and its surroundings.